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French companies caught discriminating against women over pay will be given three years to close the gap or face fines under a proposal announced ahead of International Women’s Day. If passed by parliament, the measure will be rolled out by 2020.

The government revealed the planned crackdown to unions and employers on Wednesday, giving them a month to iron out details.

Men are still paid on average nine percent more than women in France, despite equal pay laws going back 45 years.

The measure is part of a social reform bill due to be presented to Prime Minister Edouard Philippe’s cabinet at the end of next month

The Eiffel Tower was lit up in solidarity with the #MeToo Twitter trend overnight Wednesday to mark International Women’s Day, with Paris mayor Anne Hidalgo tweeting “The fight for women’s rights is every day. #8March is a day to remember together our determination and the necessity of this fight.”

Meanwhile, the UN labour agency warned that gender parity progress in the workplace could grind to a halt or even reverse.

In a new report, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) said that the global pay gap is persistent, with women on average earning 20 percent less than men.

It also found that, for every 10 men in a job globally, only six women are employed. And women are more likely to have jobs in the informal sector with low wages and few protections. Read More …

 

Meanwhile, the UN labour agency warned that gender parity progress in the workplace could grind to a halt or even reverse. In a new report, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) said that the global pay gap is persistent, with women on average earning 20 percent less than men. It also found that, for every 10 men in a job globally, only six women are employed. And women are more likely to have jobs in the informal sector with low wages and few protections.