Select Page

A defunct Chinese space laboratory is set to re-enter earth’s atmosphere in the next 24 hours hitting speeds of over 26,000 kilometres an hour before disintegrating (due to the intense heat generated during its reentry), China’s space authority said on Sunday.

The European Space Agency also made a similar projection predicting the reentry of Tiangong-1 from midnight April 1 to April 2 UTC.

Holger Krag, who heads ESA’s Space Debris Office, told RFI that the reentry will take place anywhere between the latitudes 43 degrees north and 43 degrees south.

Krag said it was not possible to predict an exact location of the reentry.  “With the reentry prediction window of eight hours uncertainty and the space station travelling at 27,000 km per hour, you can imagine that eight hours mean a lot. We cannot provide localisation at this stage,” he said.

Chinese authorities have said the spacecraft is unlikely to cause any damage when it comes down.

There is “no need for people to worry”, the China Manned Space Engineering Office said earlier on its WeChat social media account. Read More …

 

 

A defunct Chinese space laboratory is set to re-enter earth’s atmosphere in the next 24 hours hitting speeds of over 26,000 kilometres an hour before disintegrating (due to the intense heat generated during its reentry), China’s space authority said on Sunday. The European Space Agency also made a similar projection predicting the reentry of Tiangong-1 from midnight April 1 to April 2 UTC. Holger Krag, who heads ESA’s Space Debris Office, told RFI that the reentry will take place anywhere between the latitudes 43 degrees north and 43 degrees south. Krag said it was not possible to predict an exact location of the reentry.  “With the reentry prediction window of eight hours uncertainty and the space station travelling at 27,000 km per hour, you can imagine that eight hours mean a lot. We cannot provide localisation at this stage,” he said.